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ARUNACHAL PRADESH

Located in Eastern most Himalaya, offers rich variety of Tribal Ethnic Cultures and Buddhist Mongpa Tribal culture in Dirang-Tawang area. It also offers beautiful trekking Trails. Arunachal is the Bird Wathcers paradise.  

BEST TIME TO VISIT

March to May/Oct to Dec

Overview

Arunachal Pradesh is spread below the water divide between Tibet and India, on the Himalayan Watershed, and between India and Burma, along the crest of The Patkoi Hills. The region comprises 83,578-sq kms, of tangled mountain Ridges, deep valleys, dense forests, and mighty rivers. It shares a border of 157 kms with Bhutan on its West and 441 kms with Burma on its East. On its Northern frontier lies Tibet, across the McMohan Line – now disputed by China. This border runs for approximately 1030 Kms, and is neither marked, nor mutually accepted by India nor China. Along this long border the mountains rise and fall between the elevations of 6400 Meters to 1829 Meters.

Arunachal Pradesh MapThe major river valleys run generally North to South, each of them joining to form the mighty Brahmaputra in the state of Assam. The terrain is therefore a highly jagged and wild territory, rising in mighty convulsions of mountain ridges and spurs from the North bank of the Brahmaputra River. The resultant tangle of deep gorge like valleys, densely wooded mountain slopes dissected by numerous torrents and rivers, prevented East – West communications, and resulted in the growth of relatively isolated tribal sub cultures, along the river systems. It is now home to 26 main tribal strains, with their own distinct identity, of language and culture, who believe in the supernatural, and worship spirits and deities. In the higher regions a well developed Buddhist culture flourishes amongst the Monpa and Sherdupkren tribes.This state is endowed with the gifts of nature, ranging from sub-tropical river valleys, to high Himalayan Pastures.

60 years of sustained development by the Indian government, coupled with laws which allowed for the preservation of tribal identity, has resulted in the creation of a network of roads and helipads which enable travellers to visit selected sections of the state thrown open to restricted tourism.

Arunachal Pradesh is a restricted area. Certain tourist circuits are open to foreign tourists travelling in groups of 02 or more, for 30 days at a time. Tourists have to obtain a Restricted Area Permit (RAP). The Arunachal Pradesh government charges a Royalty of USD 50 per person. We will arrange the RAP for our guests. For more details ask for our Notes on Restricted entry for Foreign visitors in North East States.

Places to visit in Arunachal Pradesh

Reached by a road journey of 590 kms from Guwahati. It has the following attractions:

  

350 years old monastery at 3300 m elevation Enchanting journey over 4150 high Se-la pass. Exotic flora, Alpine lakes & tribal habitat Hand woven Tibetan rugs and carpets Trekking in the High Himalayas over virgin terrain ranging between 2500 to 5000 m in elevation. Visits to the Tibet Frontier: PTSO lake, Shungetsar Lake, Taksing Gompa and Zimithang Valley with the unique  16th century Gorsham chorten.

Itinerary

NE/AP-01: 09 Days: Tawang The Monpa Paradise

Tour Details

Travel along a mind boggling road from the Assam plains to the 3048 meters high Tawang valley, crossing over the 4150 m high Se la pass.

Explore Bomdila with its several Buddhist monasteries, and the picture postcard Dirang Valley. See the entire range of flora from Subtropical to Alpine, Himalayan uplands, Alpine lakes and, tribal hamlets.
Peep into the lifestyle of the Monpas. The highlight of the trip is a visit to the 150 years old Tawang Monastery – the fountain-head of the spiritual life of the Gelupa Sect of the Mahayana School of Budhism.

 

The Monastery retains priceless tankhas and the Ka-gyur (scriptures) written out in gold and silver , as also a 26 feet high gilded statue of Lord Buddha. Also included in the tour are Ani gompas (Buddhist nunneries), and more.

The Monpas are Buddhist by religion and the Tawang Monastery is the fountainhead of their spiritual life. They are courteous, friendly, gentle and industrious.

   

The traditional dress of the male members consists of a short woolen trouser called Kangnom or a full-length woolen trouser called Dhorna. The upper garments consists of an shirt of Tibetan style over which a full sleeved woolen jacket of red colour with opening in the front called Chuba is worn with red colored sash wound round the waist.

The ladies dress consists of an upper garment comprising a lavishly embroidered shirt with opening in the front called Kyanchen Thoe-thung, over which is worn a red colored gown with white stripes covering the body right from the shoulders to the knee level called Shingka and is girdled at the waist by a sash. A flat rectangular piece of woolen cloth is worn at the rear of the waist. Monpa women love jewellery.
Monpa headdress for both males and females is the characteristic Yak hair cap with five drain pipes to drain off the rain water.

Agriculture and animal husbandry is their main occupation of the Monpas. The main crops are Rice, Millet, Potatoes, buck wheat, and pulses. Horticulture is being developed and Apple, walnut, almonds and oranges are grown taking advantage of altitudinal variations.

Monpas live in cozy double-storied houses, constructed of stone with plank floors, often with carved doors and window frames.

Artistic by nature the Monpas weave cotton and woolen cloth and carpets, and are adept at wood carving, and bamboo handicraft. They have earned a niche for themselves as skilled painters of Buddhist monastic art –such as “thankas” and hand-made paper.

The Monpas specialize in the manufacture of incense, out of Juniper stems, barks of other trees and herbs. The incense is generally used for Puja prayer offering and purification, but it is also used as air freshener in homes and as a mosquito repellent.

Although polygamous and polyandrous marriages are in vogue, monogamy is practiced by the majority. Marriage by negotiation is the general practice. Divorce is admissible. Widow has the right to re-marry.

Itinerary

Day 01: Fly to Guwahati and drive to Tezpur

Arrive Guwahati. Drive by car to Tezpur. 195 Kms in 4 hrs. Overnight at hotel (transit halt).

Day 02: Drive Tezpur to Dirang, 1600 m

Drive to Dirang, 211 Kms in 06 hrs, crossing over the 2800 m high Bomdila pass to the picture postcard Dirang Valley at an elevation of 1600 m. Enroute visit the Tippi Orchid research centre. Overnight at hotel.

Day 03: Dirang Valley sightseeing

Explore Dirang Valley visiting an ancient Monpa Village and Gompa, the Kalachakra Monastery, and the Sangti Valley to get a peep into the life styles of the Monpas, and see their unique method of agriculture. Overnight at hotel.

Day 04: Drive Dirang- Tawang

Drive to Tawang, 165 kms. In 5.30 hrs. over the 4150 meters high Se-la Pass, which was once the battle ground between the Indian and Chinese armies. Enroute visit an Alpine Lake and Se-la temple. Overnight at hotel.

Day 05: Tawang

 

Explore the 350 years old Tawang Monastery

The famous Galden Namgyal Lhatse, was founded in the year 1860-81. This monastery is the fountain-head of the spiritual life of the Gelupa Sect of the Mahayana School of Budhism, The inner walls of the Dukhang – the assembly hall are painted with murals of various divinities and saints. The silver casket wrapped in silk containing the Thankas of Goddess Sri Devi (Palden Lhamo) the principal deity of the monastery, is kept here. It was given to Merak Lama by the Vth Dalai Lama. The Thankas were painted with blood drawn from the nose of the Fifth Dalai Lama. A colossal richly – gilded statue of Lord Buddha occupies the middle of the northern side. It is the largest image of the monastery and is about 26 feet high.
In the afternoon visit the Urgelling Monastery dating back to 1489 followed by the Seru Monpa village, and the craft center.
The Urgelling Monastery – the birth place of the Sixth Dalai Lama, who was deposed in 1706. In 1714 the destruction of all Gelupa Gompas was carried out by Sokpa Jomkhar, a Mongolian warrior who invaded from Bhutan. During this campaign, the Dalai Lama’s original monastery at Urgelling was destroyed. All valued possession of Urgelling monastery were taken to Tawang Monastery. It was during this time that the Ka-gyur (scriptures) written out in gold and silver arrived at the Tawang monastery, where they are preserved to this day. Today a modest Gompa stands at the site of the original monastery Overnight at your hotel.

Day 06: Day excursion to Himalayan uplands, Alpine lakes and Buddhist Monasteries

 

Tawang-monastery
panorama-Tsela
Drive up the “spiral staircase” road leading to the Tibet frontier, to Peng Teng Tso ( PTSO) Lake at an altitude of 4100 meters. Continue to Shungetser Lake and Taksang Gompa . Amazing scenery of Himalayan uplands. On return journey visit a Ani Gompa ( Budhist monastery) close to Tawang town. Overnight at your hotel.
Note:This trip to PTSO lake may be modified or curtailed depending upon local restriction imposed, due to security concerns relating to the Indo- Tibet border. In such a case alternative will be offered.

Day 07: Tawang- Sela—Dirang- Bomdila

Drive back 165 Kms in 5.30 hrs over the Se-la pass to Dirang. On the way stop over at Jang to visit the Indo-China War memorial. Continue from Dirang to Bomdila, another 45 kms in 1.30 hrs. Upon arrival visit the Rabgyaling Gontse Gompa, Upper Gompa , and the Thupchob Gatseling Gompa. Overnight at hotel.

Day 08: Bomdila- Tezpur

Drive back to Tezpur 166 Kms in 05.30 hrs. Overnight transit halt at hotel.

Day 09: Tezpur- Guwahati

Drive 195 kms to Guwahati airport in 04 hrs to board your departure flight to Kolkata or Delhi.
Extention: 02 nights extension available to visit Kaziranga National Park.

Reached by a road journey of 550 kms from Guwahati. Or by ferry crossing from Dibrugarh. This region has the following attractions: –

Exploring tribal lifestyles of Apatani, Nishi, Tagin Hill Miri and Adi tribes Virgin forests and exotic flora River valleys spanned by incredible cane suspension bridges Bamboo, cane, and woven handicrafts Ferry crossings over the mighty Brahmaputra River.

Itinerary

NE /AP-MWL-03 : 14 days Tribal and wildlife safari

Tour Detail 

Visiting tribal habitat  of Mishing, Apatani, Nishi, Hill Miri, Tagin and Adi tribes and Majuli Island & Kaziranga National Park

This tour is designed for travelers interested in the land, its people and wildlife. The focus is on nature, wildlife and tribal culture. The tour starts at Guwahati; explores wildlife at Kaziranga and crossing the mighty Brahmaputra River by boat, moves on to Majauli Island- the largest river island in the world, with its unique Hindu monasteries and riverine tribal culture of the Mishing tribe. Thereafter you cross the river to the North bank and enter Arunachal Pradesh to travel to Ziro. Now begins a traverse of the river valleys of the Subhansiri, Syiom, and Siang rivers.

 You will journey through the fascinating tribal habitat of Apatani, Nishi (Daflas), Tagin, Hill Miri, and Adi tribes . Explore ethnic homesteads, visit tribal shamans, and peep into beliefs and culture, see their handicrafts and incredible cane and bamboo suspension bridges. During the journey we will pass through miles of forests, and marvel at the incredible variety of flora. Finally we will cross the mighty Brahmaputra River by ferry, for the third time, navigating through sand bars to Dibrugarh in Assam.

 Day 01: Guwahati – Kaziranga NP.

Arrive Guwahati airport. Transfer by car from Guwahati to Kaziranga. Drive East through the wide a scenic Brahmaputra Valley ( Also called the Assam Vallkey), for 220 Kms in 4.30 hrs to Kaziranga National Park. Upon arrival, check in at Wild Life Resort for overnight.

 (The World Heritage Kaziranga National Park. has more than 70% of the world’s one-horned rhino population, 70% of the world population of the Eastern Swamp Deer and 75% of the world’s wild Asiatic water buffalo. It has a significant population of the Asian Elephant. Close encounters with the Great Indian one horned Rhino, and wild Indian Elephants Swamp Deer, Asiatic Water buffalo, and a host of animals are assured. The Park also has more than 450 species of birds, 18 of them are globally threatened species. The Bengal Florican is the main attraction.)

Day 02: Kaziranga

Two wild life safaris by jeep in the outlying ranges of the park. Overnight at hotel / lodge.

Day 03: Kaziranga- Majauli Island

 Early morning Elephant safari followed by one wildlife safaris by jeep.

After early lunch transfer to Nimati Ghat via Jorhat 140 Kms in 2.30 hrs. Arrive in time to board the afternoon ferry and cross the Brahmaputra River to Kamlabari ghat at Majauli Island in 1.30 hrs.

Transfer to community home run by the Mishing tribe – a unique property constructed exactly like a Mishing tribal house out of Bamboo and thatch; with modern toilets. Overnight.

(Majauli is famous as the world’s largest river Island. But it is really more interesting, for its 22 satras – Hindu Vaishnava monastries that are also centres for the arts. At the satras, Lord Vishnu is worshipped through dance dramas re-enacting the stories of the Mahabharata, with music and poetry. The satras take in young boys and groom them. The daily routine includes working in the fields, tending cattle, prayer, discussion and study. The satras have also nurtured certain arts and craft traditions, which can now be found only here. In Natun Samugri satra for instance, one can still find the craft of mask-making; Kamlabari satra still makes the finest boats.)

Day 04: Majauli exploration

Explore the Island, Visit a Satra and tribal villages. See locals engaged in riverine agriculture, fishing, weaving and pottery making Explore the shoreline in a country boat for water birds, and watch the breathtaking sunset on the great river. Overnight at Community home.

Day 05: Majauli – Zero ( Arunachal Pradesh)

 Drive North from Majauli to cross the river by ferry to North Lakhimpur, Continue up the forested mountain road . The 220 Kms journey will take 6-7 hrs. Enroute there will be time to peep into some tribal villages. Ziro, is the headquarters of the Lower Subhansiri District located in the the Apatani valley – plateau. Overnight at your hotel.

The Apatanis occupy a 26 sq Kms valley-plateau in central Subhansiri at an altitude of 1524 m. The plateau is enclosed by steeply rising ridges rising to 2438 m. Drained by the Kali River it is entirely taken up with wet-field cultivation. Population is near 22000 (1991). They can be best described as “animist-shamanist”. Experts at wet-farming methods, the people are agriculturists growing rice, and millet. Field work is done entirely by iron hoes, digging sticks and batons.

Day 06: Ziro

 

Take a 03 hours walk to explore three Apatani tribal villages. E.T. Dalton noted in 1845, “The men do not rejoice in much drapery, they wear a girdle of canework painted red which hangs behind in long bushy tail.” Just as the tail is the distinctive part of the male dress, so is the nose plug peculiar to the Apatani women” Return to the hotel for lunch. In the afternoon, we drive to Hung Apatani village – the largest village of this tribe. Overnight at your hotel.

Day 07: Ziro- day trip to Nishi tribal village

 Drive 15 kms to Nishi Tribal Village. Visit the tribal long house. Return to your hotel for lunch.

(Neighbours of the Apatanis, the Nishis are a strudy and proud hill tribe, considered independent, and turbulent during the British “Raj”. They live in “long houses” – each may shelter up to 20 families. More warlike the Nishis are not proficient in arts. They are adept at cane work and some weaving. They are individualistic – the society has no chiefs, and no council of elders. They have a strong belief in different spirits – good and evil, each with assigned habitat. The spirits are placated by sacrifice of animals.)

In the afternoon, visit the local handicraft centre, tribal museum, orchid centre and bazaar. Overnight at hotel.

Day 08: Ziro- Domporijo

Drive 180 kms to Domporijo – a small market town of the Tagin Tribe, close to Daporijo the headquaters of the Upper Subhansiri District. On the way we will stop; to walk up to Raga – a village of the Hill Miri Tribe in the Kamala River Valley.

Hill Miris numbering about 11000 (1991), occupy the valley of the Kamala River at altitudes of 900 to 1200 m. Living in very small villages – seldom more than 20 houses each 60-70 feet long sited on slits with gabled roofs made of leaves. A chief heads the village. Like others the Hill Miris also believe in a host of benevolent and malevolent spirits and the Sun-Moon god.

Overnight at Damporijo circuit house / homestay / hotel.

Day 09: Domporijo

Explore the habitat of the Tagin tribe. Drive for about 30 Kms into the surrounding areas to explore the Tagin tribal villages of Dolum and Sappi.

(Numbering around 18800 ( 1991) souls, the Tagins inhabit the upper Kamala Valley. Difficult terrain isolated the tribe. They were first surveyed in 1911. Very volatile and independent people, they have a history of massacring outsiders – the last outrage was in 1953 when 47 out of a government party of 165 were killed. Road building and setting up of administrative centers at Daporijo and Limakang have helped in bringing the tribe into the mainstream. The society is divided into distinct classes in hierarchical order – rich, middle-class, poor, hunters, priests, shamans, and slaves (no longer). Religious practices are shamanistic with rites and sacrifices propitiating inimical spirits. The sun-moon god is at the apex with unlimited powers – all benevolent. They practice shifting cultivation producing rice, maize, tubers, and vegetables. They also grow tobacco and are persistent smokers. Tagins are expert hunters and use poison from plants for arrows. Selling of land is considered taboo, as the presiding spirit is likely to be annoyed and bring misfortune.)

In the afternoon visit the local handicraft centre and the bazaar. Overnight at circuit house / homestay / hotel.

Day 10: Damporijo– Along

 Drive 147 kms in 05 hours, to the town of Along- the Headquarters of the West Siang District.. Located at an altitude of 350 m it is set in a wide open valley where the Sippu River joins the Siyom River The people are mostly Adi-Gollongs with some Adi- Miniyongs.

(Adis ( Abhor) are the dominant tribe of the Siang River Valley. They are also the largest with a population of around 1,58000. ( 1991). They comprise of two sub-groups: 1) Gallongs – include Gallongs, Ramos, Bokars, and Palbos 2) Padam-Miyong sub group: Includes Padams, Ninyongs, Pasis, Panggis, Shimongs, Boris, Asings, and Tangams. All groups are bound together by common language and culture with dialectal differences. A unique hairstyle – with short cropping with a knife are a distinctive feature. The British considered the Adis as powerful people, proud and outspoken, friendly, hospitable and social –but suspicious of strangers, Today the community is considered as “progressive”. Adi society is highly organized with political institutions like the village council. Originally dominated by priests and shamans and deriving authority from supernatural sanctions, it was transformed into a secular body during the British period when power was vested in nominated village headmen. The institution of separate boys and girls dormitory has far reaching influences on personality development and community cooperation. The Adis also believe in numerous spirits and the sun-Moon- God ( Dony- polo). They are great agriculturist cultivating rice, maize, millet, buckwheat, mustard, ginger, potatoes, tobacco, chilly, and vegetables. There is a vast store of folklore. Elders are endowed with prodigious memory. This oral literature takes the form of rhapsodies called “Abang”. People love to dance. The “Tapu” war dance ( Minyong tribe) by males and “Ponung” welcome dance by girls are well known. Over the years the Adis have demonstrated a rare native ingenuity in constructing cane and bamboo bridges over great spans. They are adept at making cantilever bridges of bamboo, suspension bridges with ribbed bamboo footways, trestle bridges and their combinations. Cane suspension bridges are indeed a marvel of “untutored engineering skills.”)

Day 11: Along countryside exploration

Walk to visit Paia and Kabu Villages inhabited by the Adi- Galongs. This entails walking over a cane suspension bridge. Return to Along to visit local handicraft centre and bazaar. Overnight at your hotel.

Day 12: Along- Passighat

 Drive Along to Passighat. The distance is only 68 Kms. The road follows the Siyom River till it joins the Siang river; which originates as the Tsang Po in Tibet, and latter is called the Brahmaputra. Enroute we will take time to visit an Adi Minyong tribal village, and experience crossing the Siang over the longest suspension bridge, to take a nature and culture walk using inter-village tracks to explore more tribal villages in the countryside. Arrive at Passighat late afternoon. Overnight at your hotel / government guest house.

Day 13: Passighat – ferry crossing – Dibrugarh

Drive to Urium Ghat in 02 hrs to board our local ferry boat to cross the mighty Brahmaputra river in 03-04 hrs. Once across, drive to Dibrugarh. Overnight at hotel.

Day 14: Departure

 Transfer to airport to board your flight to Kolkata or Delhi. TOUR ENDS.

Picture post card, Mechuka is a remote small town nestled at 1,829 m, in the Siyom River Valley in West Siang It is located just 29 Kms from The Indo- china border Mechuka is reached by driving over two days from Dibrugarh – the nearest airport. via Along ( also called Allo). The scenic journey of 262 Kms includes crossing of the mighty Brahmaputra by ferry boat.The Mechuka Valley is home to the people of the Budhist Memba tribe. The surrounding areas are also home to the Adi- Ramo tribals who inhabit the villages of Gapo, Pauk, Padusa, Lipusi, Hiri, Purying, Rapum, Charung, Rego,and Karte The major tourist attractions are the breathtaking scenic beauty, of the surrounding mountains, snow capped in winter, with the sparkling River Siyom meandering through the valley. The exotic tribes, and the 400-year-old Buddhist Monastery, are an added attraction.

Itinerary

NE/AP-02: 10 days Enchanting Mechuka ValleyExploring Memba, Adi Ramos and Adi Gallong tribal habitat.

Tour Details

Visit the Syiom, river valley, to peep into the tribal habitat of Memba , Adi Ramo and Adi Gallong tribals.
Travel to the enchanting Mechuka Valley on the border with Tibet. Marvel at the spectacular scenery of the river Valley , visit ethnic villages, explore homesteads, peep into local lifestyles, see their handicrafts and the incredible cane and bamboo suspension bridges. During the journey you will pass through miles of forests, with an incredible variety of flora. The crossing of the mighty Brahmaputra by ferry boat, navigating through sand bars, is another high light of this trip.

Day 01: Arrive Dibrugarh
Arrive Dibrugarh airport from Kolkata or Delhi.

Transfer to hotel. Time permitting explore a tea garden. Overnight at hotel.

Day 02: Dibrugarh- Along ( Aalo), 350 m

Drive from Dibrugarh to Boghibheel ghat 43 Kms, and cross the river Brahmaputra by Ferry boat along with your car to Silapather to enter arunachal Pradesh at Likabadi. The entire journey will take 3-4 hrs
From Likhabadi drive 130 Kms to Along in 4.30 hrs. Located at an altitude of 350 m, Along is set in a wide open valley where the Sippu River joins the Siyom River.
The people are mostly Adi-Gollongs with some Adi- Miniyongs.
Adis ( Abhor) are the dominant tribe of the Siang River Valley. They are also the largest with a population of around 1,58000. ( 1991). They comprise of two sub-groups: 1) Gallongs – include Gallongs, Ramos, Bokars, and Palbos 2) Padam-Miyong sub group: Includes Padams, Ninyongs, Pasis, Panggis, Shimongs, Boris, Asings, and Tangams. All groups are bound together by common language and culture with dialectal differences.
A unique hairstyle – with short cropping with a knife are a distinctive feature. The British considered the Adis as powerful people, proud and outspoken, friendly, hospitable and social –but suspicious of strangers, Today the community is considered as “progressive”. Adi society is highly organized with political institutions like the village council. Originally dominated by priests and shamans and deriving authority from supernatural sanctions, it was transformed into a secular body during the British period when power was vested in nominated village headmen. The institution of separate boys and girls dormitory has far reaching influences on personality development and community cooperation. The Adis also believe in numerous spirits and the sun-Moon- God ( Dony- polo). They are great agriculturist cultivating rice, maize, millet, buckwheat, mustard, ginger, potatoes, tobacco, chilly, and vegetables. There is a vast store of folklore. Elders are endowed with prodigious memory. This oral literature takes the form of rhapsodies called “Abang”.
People love to dance. The “Tapu” war dance ( Minyong tribe) by males and “Ponung” welcome dance by girls are well known.
Over the years the Adis have demonstrated a rare native ingenuity in constructing cane and bamboo bridges over great spans. They are adept at making cantilever bridges of bamboo, suspension bridges with ribbed bamboo footways, trestle bridges and their combinations. Cane suspension bridges are indeed a marvel of “untutored engineering skills.
Time permitting, in the afternoon visit Paia and Kabu Villages inhabited by the Adi- Galongs. This entails a short trek and crossing over a cane suspension bridge.
Return to Along for overnight at hotel.

Day 03: Along- Mechuka, 1829 m

Drive 181 kms (5-6 hrs) along the scenic Siyom Valley, to the remote Mechuka Valley Lush forests in the Lower Siyom Valley give way to the spectacular Mechuka Valley. Open and barren, with the blue river separating the valley in two parts, the village, is surrounded by snow-capped mountains, The landscape is similar to Ladakh, with a sprinkling of green forests. Overnight at homestay/ hotel

Day 04-05-06: Mechuka

03 days to explore Mechuka Valley, visit the Gompa, and enjoy nature.
A short trek to visit a tribal village and get a peep into lifestyles will be arranged.
Overnights at homestay/hotel

The remote Mechuka Valley in the West Siang district, is just 30 kilometers from the line that separates India and China. Recently opened to foreign tourist, it is a place of pristine natural beauty. The river Siyom (locally known as Yargyap Chu), meanders through the valley surrounded by snow capped mountains on three sides.

The major tourist attraction here is a 400-year-old Buddhist Monastery, Many ancient statues can also be found here. During winters, one can get great views of the snow-clad mountains and snow fall.

The inhabitants are a mix of Memba, Ramo and Bokhar tribes, who migrated from Tibet, many centuries ago. The Membas settled down in the Upper reaches of the siyom Valley, whilst The Ramos and Bokhars choose to live in the Lower Siyom valley.
The Membas are a subgroup of the Monpas, and speak the Tshangla language. They live in the Mechuka valley; where the population is around 4000 to 5000 The religious life of the Memba revolves around the Mechuka Gompa. The Membas follow Nyingmapa Tibetan Buddhism and have their own script, Hikor, which is derived from the Tibetan script. Local genealogies suggested that they came from Tawang and settled in the region several centuries back.

The Membas are agriculturalists and grow cash crops in the terraced fields, and crops like rice, maize, millet, potato, cereals and paddy.
The Ramos are animists and practice the Donyi Polo ( Sun- Moon worship).
They are agriculturists and hunters. The main crop is maize. They also grow rice, chillies, garlic, ginger, onion, potatoes, sweet potatoes, cotton, tobacco, mustard, cucumbers, and pumpkins, Main villages of this tribe on the periphery of Mechukha valley are Gapo, Pauk, Padusa, Lipusi, Hiri, Purying, Rapum, Charung, Rego and Karte.

Day 07: Mechuka- Along

Drive back to Along. Overnight at homestay/ hotel.

Day 08: Along – Passighat

Drive along the Siyom River, till its confluence with the mighty, Siang, which originates as the Tsang Po in Tibet, and latter is called the Brahmaputra.
Following the course of the river downstream, we drive to Passighat, the Headquaters of the East Siang District. The drive is 68 kms, and takes 02 hrs. On the way we will take time off to see one of the longest cane bridges, across the Siang.
The Adi’s are expert at building cane suspension bridges. You can also cross it to get the experience of a lifetime. Time permitting we will also take a nature and culture walk using inter-village tracks to explore the countryside. Passighat is located at a point where the river emerges from the hills into the Assam Plains, and whilst driving down, there are wonderful views. Overnight at the Government Guest House or hotel.

Day 09: Passighat – ferry crossing – Dibrugarh

Drive to Urium Ghat in 02 hrs to board our local ferry boat to cross the mighty Brahmaputra river in 03 hrs. Once across, drive to Dibrugarh. Overnight at hotel.

Day 10: Departure

Transfer to airport to board your flight to Kolkata or Delhi.

The Mishmi Hills in the Dibang Valley are a southward extension of the Great Himalayan Mountain Range – its northern and eastern reaches touching China. The Dibang river originates in China and flows through the length of the valley in a north-south direction. Snow-capped peaks, turbulent rivers, deep valleys, and abundance of rich flora & fauna are the main features of the district. Anini , the capital town of this district is reached by a 380 Kms journey from Dibrugarh; the nearest airport. This takes two days and involves travelling through the Tea gardens of Assam, the floodplains of the Brahmaputra River Valley, crossing the great River by Ferry and ascending the Mishmi hills.  A trek to the remote Dree Valley can take you through the Idu –Mishimi tribal habitat to Acheson; the last Indian village in the remote border area with Tibet.

 

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